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How are you living day to day with the coronavirus pandemic and with social distancing measures? What’s working for you or bringing you solace? What challenges are you facing?

Send us a photo and a caption if you feel like sharing what you are doing to weather the pandemic. And if you’d prefer not to share a photo, send us your “snapshot” in prose — 100 words or less. We’ll post an updated sample of your submissions regularly. E-mail: letter@globe.com.

Here’s how Globe readers are coping.

Friday, March 27
Jenna McPhee

Full-time working mom bringing the classroom outside and teaching my kids that this is so much more than just about us. So many people stopped by, from a distance, to share their heartfelt stories. A neighbor shared that her daughter is a nurse on the front lines. Perspective. — Jenna McPhee, Canton

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I invited my extended family — 29 siblings, nieces, nephews, and cousins — to share by e-mail their challenges and opportunities in dealing with this pandemic. Interesting to note commonalities of those living in different communities across this country. Even more interesting to learn about those dealing with a wide range of health and work-related issues. — Floyd Alwon, Needham

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Gayle H. Edson

Every time I reach for a puzzle piece, she scratches me. — Gayle H. Edson, Wakefield

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I take a power walk to the Charlestown Navy Yard each morning. On a gray day, passing the now-deserted USS Constitution, Three Dog Night’s “Joy to the World” queued up on my music, and I sang along as loud as I could. Felt better. — Lynne Byall Benson, Charlestown

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Carl Zukroff

While the president delivered his daily briefing last Friday (March 20), I called a mandatory meeting with my coats in the living room. They all attended: two collapsible rain slickers, one fall wool jacket, five vests, one raincoat, one long woolen dress coat, four barn coats and/or silk jackets, two jean jackets, one pea coat, two down jackets, one leather jacket, five hooded and unhooded fleece jackets. A total of 25 pieces of outerwear. Let me repeat that: 25. At the conclusion of the meeting, I decided no one needs that many. Goodwill now has the peacoat, the woolen dress coat, one barn coat, one vest, and two ill-fitting fleece jackets (unhooded). I’ll be fine. — Carl Zukroff, Brighton

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Wednesday, March 25
Melody Winnig

I roam where I can on the trails and streets near my house. I have walked here for 35 years, with dogs, with friends, with grandkids, and with strangers. But now I always walk alone and create impermanent “chalk talk” markings to let other humans know we are not walking alone. — Melody Winnig, Wayland

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How am I coping? Living alone at 82 could be a challenge, but fortunately my children and their families live close by. Being somewhat computer savvy helps. Several weeks ago I took a memoir-writing workshop, so I have begun writing vignettes of my life. After reading about a free online course offered by a Yale professor, I signed up. The content deals with increasing happiness in one’s life — what a good time to do that! — Lynn Gaulin, North Attleborough

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Jim Hamilton

Shelter-in-place beard update: I’m planning on taking a picture every week until this is over. The last one was taken three days in [scroll down to March 18], so this one is from Day 10. — Jim Hamilton, Marshfield

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Tuesday, March 24
Jill Harrison Berg

A few nights ago, my neighbor asked me to come out to my porch at 7 p.m., and we sang “Hey Jude” together across my yard. Now singing together has become a nightly ritual, involving growing numbers of neighbors. Let’s not practice “social distancing” exactly — let’s keep 6 feet of physical distance, but stay socially connected. So lean out your window, come out to your porch, or come stroll down the street, and #singfromsixfeet! Each night’s song is chosen by Secret Boston. — Jill Harrison Berg, Jamaica Plain

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Valerie A. Russo

I’m photographing nature at local parks and making e-greeting cards to post on Facebook for my pun-loving friends and family. — Valerie A. Russo, Weymouth

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Sarah Glover

All will be well (Burma-Shave-style). — Sarah Glover, Arlington

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Mintz Family

I am a competitive ice dancer, and all the rinks are closed. So instead, I am taking jogs and walks every day and using weights and doing abs. Another way I am keeping busy is I am running an online book club on jitsi meet. I have at least seven people, and it is a really good way to keep connected. The photo is of me trying out a computer camera. — Simon Mintz, Age 12, Lexington

Monday, March 23


Pam Hays

Finding solace going for a (short) walk in my “Garden in the Almost-Woods.” — Pam Hays, Littleton

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Maureen Atkins

During the pandemic — what really seems like the first one I’ve experienced in my almost 98 years — I am enjoying the St. Patrick’s Day flowers that my son sent me as well as the corned beef and cabbage my daughter brought me. I am keeping busy by quilting and reading my beloved Boston Globe. — Mary Murray McCarthy, West Roxbury

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Susan Dromey Heeter

We are playing “Guess the Etch Movie” on our Etch A Sketches. My “King Kong” was an easy guess. — Susan Dromey Heeter, Dover N.H.



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When my grocery store was out of the bread I usually buy, I discovered a delicious loaf I never would have bought. — Harriet Dann, Needham

Friday, March 20


Sunshine Menezes

I found this leaf stuck between the boards of my deck Wednesday. He’s social distancing, but I think he’s struggling with anxiety. It’s OK, leaf. We’re all having a hard time. I’m here for you. — Sunshine Menezes, West Kingston, R.I.

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Robert Steen, Spring Hill, Florida

I am sheltering in place. In the springs of central Florida as often as possible. That’s my kind of social distancing. Keeping the immune system tuned up and trying to make wise choices when it’s necessary to be out and about in public. Stay safe and well, everyone. — David Burn, Weeki Wachee, Florida

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Rachel Evans

For my dad’s 86th birthday, we filled all the bird feeders at his nursing home, spoke on the phone, and waved through the window. He thinks this quarantine is nonsense. (The image is through his window, with a reflection of us and the bird-feeders.) — Rachel Evans, Somerville

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Thursday, March 19

My gym recently closed, which means no more tennis indoors for a while. Very disappointing. Went for a lovely, sunny, and calm walk along the river. Two tennis courts sat unused, with a couple perched outside on a bench, holding their rackets. Why weren’t they playing? Did someone forget the balls? After a bit, they left. My husband and I checked out the courts. The gates were locked. We checked out the lonely playground nearby without screaming kids. Also locked. This is all like a bad movie. When will it end? — Nanda Calla, Chelsea Waterfront

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Julian Kenneth Braxton

I read an article once in The New York Times titled, “You Should Actually Send That Thank You Note You’ve Been Meaning to Write.” Well, this time at home, away from my daily work schedule, has given me the time to write those thank you notes — finally! My plan is to write a note a day during the weeks to come. I will be writing mentors, former teachers, ministers, and even authors who have inspired me. But I am starting off with a thank you note to my academic dean of studies. She has been preparing the faculty for the online teaching and learning we are about to embark on with our students after spring break. Indeed, even during this time of uncertainty, I have so much to be thankful for. — Julian Kenneth Braxton, Boston

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Maria Photinakis

I’m a local cartoonist and I’ve been keeping a visual journal of what life has been like during all this social distancing. It’s a crucial way of keeping records for my daughter for when she’s older (when she hopefully won’t remember this), and to keep myself sane. I’m posting them online and I am amazed at how much my thoughts and experiences help buoy others — we are all in this together. — Maria Photinakis, Waltham

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The first time I took a weeklong silent retreat at a monastery in the 1980s, I felt like a religious hotshot. Solitude — no crockpot, no squabbles, no traffic — was mine. Within 24 hours, I became furious. Why was no one speaking to me? Why were they all so rude — monks and everyone? Be patient. Wait for God. Baloney, I thought. Alone, I prayed and wrote letters of rage and sorrow to God. Slowly, a surge of safety and truth, wrapped in silence, rose up inside me. I met my self. Is there a “retreat” in social distancing? — The Rev. Lyn Gillespie Brakeman, Cambridge


Wednesday, March 18

A scene from last Friday, as reality and panic set in, and I stood in the Trader Joe’s checkout line: The woman behind me, a tense scramble of fear, stage-whispered into her phone, “There’s a cart in front of me with four-dozen eggs!” I turned to her, smiled, and said calmly, “I don’t mean to eavesdrop, but this is normal for my shopping cart. I’m picking up my son from college. He eats four eggs every morning.” — Ann Marie Lindquist, Lexington

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Jane Stabile

Last night we enjoyed a family dinner at our home in Cambridge with our three daughters and their families, who never left their homes in Wakefield, Plymouth, and Ashland. Everybody set their own table (we used the best dishes, and candles), made dinner, and everyone sat down to eat at 6:30, signed into Google Hangouts (but any meeting software would do). Maybe next time we will all cook the same meal. — Jane Stabile, Cambridge

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Sara Buttrick

A work in progress: stenciling my bathroom. — Sara Buttrick, Maynard

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Jim Hamilton

The last public event I attended was church on Sunday. I do not intend to shave again until things are back to normal. I call it my “shelter-in-place” beard. — Jim Hamilton, Marshfield






Tuesday, March 17
Tracy Relle

Staying in Carrabassett Valley, Maine. While Sugarloaf may be closed, there is plenty of hiking to be had and solace to be found in the woods.

Tracy Relle

And coming home to this chucklehead (Chester) doesn’t hurt. Wishing everyone well during this crazy time.

Tracy Relle, Carrabassett Valley, Maine

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Paul E. Greenberg

Gun sales are way up. A sense of panic. Fear everywhere. Lives disrupted. No end in sight. But amid the chaos, any island of sanity is all the more appreciated. In normal times, Trader Joe’s in Coolidge Corner is a popular destination. But in these abnormal times, it is absolutely inundated with worried shoppers. And yet, five minutes before it opened one morning, the spontaneous order of a long single-file line reminded me that people are capable of civilized behavior even in trying times. Very reassuring.

Paul E. Greenberg, Brookline

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Beth Gamse

By trying to find humor somewhere, anywhere.

Beth Gamse, Cambridge







Matthew Bernstein is the Globe’s letters editor. He can be reached at matthew.bernstein@globe.com and on Twitter at @GlobeBernstein.