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LETTERS

Mayor Walsh should look to city’s creative industry

Members of the Boston Art Commission talked with students from Conservatory Lab Charter School in April 2016 after the students asked the commission to erect a statue of Frederick Douglass in Boston.
Members of the Boston Art Commission talked with students from Conservatory Lab Charter School in April 2016 after the students asked the commission to erect a statue of Frederick Douglass in Boston.Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

It is encouraging to see Mayor Martin J. Walsh pay closer attention to the memorials in Boston and to racial equity. How the mayor supports the Black Lives Matter movement at this time of crises will have a real impact on the next generation — not just for Black people but for all of society.

It is important that Mayor Walsh seize this historic moment to offer resources to local creative workers, such as sculptors, art teachers, and others. The creative industry is a field that can generate wealth, income, and jobs to improve the standard of living of the city’s Black residents as well as women- and Black-owned businesses.

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A 2005 report on the city’s creative economy that was prepared for Create Boston found that in 2002, “creative industries added $10.7 billion to Boston’s total economic output (7.8%) and $2.6 billion to personal income within the region as a whole.” Local creative workers help developers, planners, and policy makers build neighborhoods and a supportive environment that enables children to feel safe and valued. They have invaluable expertise to help the mayor address the cause of disparities.

Since the dialogue on equity will continue, Mayor Walsh should keep this option in mind.

Samareign Hassan

Owner

33Fusion

Roxbury

Dumas F. Lafontant

Hyde Park

33Fusion features the work of local artists. Lafontant is a consultant to the Frederick Douglass Sculpture Committee, which is working to create a monument in Boston.