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LETTERS

Trump raises pandemic pressure on colleges

The University of Massachusetts Boston has said that the campus will remain closed this fall with no in-person classes. International students account for about 12.5 percent of the student body.
The University of Massachusetts Boston has said that the campus will remain closed this fall with no in-person classes. International students account for about 12.5 percent of the student body.Blake Nissen for the Boston Globe

Pence has an odd view of CDC guidelines

Re “Trump doubles down on reopening schools” (Page A1, July 9): Vice President Mike Pence says that “we don’t want the guidance from CDC to be a reason why schools don’t open.” Where is the logic and sense in that? Isn’t that what guidelines are for? If the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines cannot be met, then states and communities cannot follow through with plans to reopen schools for so-called business as usual.

Reopening guidelines for every state, community, and school must ensure that our children and staffs are safe. CDC guidelines must set a high bar, not a low one, to ensure this safety. That is when good learning can and will take place. Schools across this country should not become Petri dishes for COVID-19.

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Furthermore, it is frightening to consider that the administration is playing politics with children’s lives. Why do I think that Trump wants to open schools not because he so values education but mainly so that the workforce can get humming, improve the economy, and help his reelection prospects?

The economy will surely improve when the country gains control of the spread of this virus. Solid leadership can get us there; selfish leadership cannot.

Linda L. Greyser

Boston

The writer is a former teacher, school committee member, and university administrator and is now a consultant in educational accountability and improvement.


Schools being forced to choose between safety risk and excluding foreign students


International students bring to our communities diverse perspectives and skills, but the latest announcement from US Immigration and Customs Enforcement will force international students whose universities have decided to teach remotely this fall to leave the United States or face deportation (”For foreign students, in-person classes only,” Page A4, July 7). This includes 12.5 percent of students at the University of Massachusetts Boston, where I teach; 21.1 percent at Harvard; and many other students at many other Massachusetts institutions of higher learning.

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This is horrifyingly counterproductive, undermines the stability of these students’ lives, forces institutions to choose between risking spread of the virus and excluding international students, and depletes our communities with no clear benefit.

Call on ICE to extend the exceptions already granted to international students for the spring and summer in response to the pandemic.

Brook Moyers

Dorchester

The writer is an assistant professor of biology.